Tag Archives: Visionary

The Day A Visionary Died

When visionaries come along, they are usually not always thought to be so when they hit the scene. Many times, once they do reach a certain level of stature or praise, they lose their vision.  We’ve seen it time and again in history. When the Beastie Boys came on the scene in a big way in 1986, most people didn’t know what to make of them as white guys in a rap world where most artists were not. People didn’t know whether to write them off as jokes or pay attention to them as real things – the fact that before their transition to rap, they were not doing to well on the punk scene. What ultimately helped them sustain, was the punk attitudes that they intertwined with their rap and hip-hop leanings. Over the course of the nearly 30 years since, they were masters at blazing new trails in music, art and video – and their creator and ringleader on the video and arts front was Adam Yauch (also known as MCA).  Sadly, he died today of Cancer. Luckily, Yauch was appreciated in his lifetime as a visionary and we are all the beneficiaries of his .

While the music the Beastie Boys created continued to evolve, it always maintained a consistent style.  Whether it was three rappers (Yauch, Adam Horovitz/Adrock, Michael Diamond/Mike D) with a turntablist, instrumentalist with a layer of quick staccato MCs on top or a multi-layered mix of original music, samples and thoughtful rhymes – you always knew you were listening to the Beastie Boys. While the styles might have shifted slightly, the core remained the same.

Their play within the art and video worlds ran along the same lines as their music – using styles that everyone knew and felt comfortable with and then adding their own layers on top to make their products as great as your uncles old cardigan that you used to snuggle with. Their spirit and attitude remained consistent and what may have first led you to ask, “are they for real?”, ultimately made you think that everyone other than them were just posing. And Yauch had a lot to do with that.

Though Yauch always seemed like the most subdued of the three to me, his work directing a large number of their videos (under his pseudonym, Nathaniel Hörnblowér) always seemed to push the boundaries of what was acceptable, but still seemed as right as a chill afternoon hanging with your best friends. The Beastie’s collection of music videos is the only music video set that has actually been released as part of The Criterion Collection.

Yauch used his position to do numerous things for the benefit of society and seemed to have no shortage of friends to help him pull these off.  Whether it was the organizing of benefit concerts to Free Tibet or end violence in New York City, he made the best use of his connections. Though I took some pride that he (and the rest of the boys) spent some quality time in one of my old neighborhoods (Atwater Village, Silver Lake, Los Feliz) it was clear what sway the five boroughs held on him and his cohorts. They’re love was greatly shown in their last few releases.

When someone has a vision like Yauch had when he first put the band together and then expanded with the creation of Oscilloscope Laboratories, the recording and film studio he started a decade ago, its hard not to want to be a part of it. Whether watching with envy the people selected for the crowdsourced Beastie Boys concert video he directed (Awesome: I F—in’ Shot That!) or the wonderment when watching all of the stars (i.e. Susan Sarandon, Stanley Tucci, Seth Rogen, Elijah Wood, Will Arnett, Ted Danson, Alicia Silverstone, Steve Buscemi, Mary Steenburgen, Kirsten Dunst, Jack Black, Will Ferrell, and on and on) he got to take roles in his long form video return to Fight For Your Right: Revisited (below), his presence, power and influence was clear and we can now only image what could have been.  At the end of Revisited (which clearly illustrates the consistency of the Beastie Boys brand – cool, irreverent, sense of humor), there’s a “To Be Continued: Check back in 25” years. I only wish we could.

RIP MCA, I’m sorry and Saddened that you left so soon…

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Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish

It was almost like Steve Jobs even had the forethought to write and present his own epitaph, obituary or funeral speech when he addressed the 2005 graduating class at Stanford.  Other than reflecting on time, choices and just being, at the end, he implored his listeners to “Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish.” With the introspection and sadness that someone who has changed so many people’s lives should die so relatively young, we can only hope that we can take Jobs’ directive to heart.

You can read the entire transcript, but here is an excerpt that rings especially true:

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

A truly visionary man who ended up having more money than we might know what to do with was not able to overcome the cancer that ultimately led to his death, and he could see that it was OK.  The piece from his address above could easily be considered a mantra if not just a great bit of  “How-To” insight.

Already, there has been an outpouring of love and respect – with tributes popping up at Apple stores around the world.  The juxtaposition between the commercial aspect of the stores and the fact that this visionary was the driving force behind that really speaks to the impact he had whether people met him or not.

Jobs didn’t have as much time to string more dots to connect (a notion of part of his address) as he probably should have, but he was able to connect more dots in a shortened life than many ever hope to do in their own lives.  He has joined the list of innovators and visionaries who leave us to wonder “what could have been” if they were allowed to live longer.  Maybe what happens is meant to be – some speak of a larger narrative where things, including death, are pre-determined. Hopefully, we can work through that and set our course to make a change for the better – where we Stay Hungry and Stay Foolish.